Monthly Archives September 2017

Parable of the Two Sons

26th Sunday in Ordinary Time Jesus presents us with the parable of the two sons (Matthew. 21:28-32): one, when invited to work in the vineyard, says ‘No’ but later thought the better of it and goes, and another who says ‘Yes’ but did not go. The son who did not go used the words, “Certainly Sir”.  ‘Sir’, is a word which is also translated as ‘Lord’ (Kyrie).  Jesus reinforces what he said in an earlier episode: “…it is not everyone who says, Lord, Lord, who does the will of the Father (Matthew. 7:21) ”.   Others who have said ‘No’ to
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Death Has Loss Its Sting…

25th Sunday in Ordinary Time   The second reading for this Sunday is somewhat of a paradox – as Saint Paul writes, “For to me life is Christ, and death is gain.” Generally most people don’t think of death as gain. But this phrase used by Paul shows that thanks to Christ, everything we do here on earth is unified to what happens to us after death. For Pagan religions back then, death was considered ‘the great destroyer’, and whilst they did believe in some form of after-life, it was meaningless and joyless. But in Christianity, Christ broke down that
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If you have not warned the wicked man, then I will hold you responsible for his death.

23rd Sunday in Ordinary TIme   Our reading from Ezekiel this week contains some rather heavy language pertaining to sin and death. Not only does it remind us of the seriousness of sin, but also of our responsibility in helping others to avoid it. This can be a difficult task. No-one really likes to approach people to question or challenge their behaviour – in our Gospel it takes at least two people. But rest-assured if we pray to have the persons best interests at heart, then they will come to understand it not as a personal attack but rather as
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Take up Your Cross and Follow Me….

22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time It is very interesting to see how we as a community of believers can, at times, lose our Catholic culture and consciousness.  There was a time, when the majority of Catholics would instinctively know that we use the Crucifix in our liturgical celebrations rather than an ‘empty’ cross.  Thus there was a time when our liturgical documents loosely used the word ‘cross’ even when referring to the ‘crucifix’, taking it for granted that Catholics would know.  Furthermore, in the Latin version of the documents, the word ‘crux’, which literally means ‘cross’, was used also to
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