Posts by OLV Parish

You will never be thirsty again…

(3rd Sunday of Lent) I have always encouraged Catholics to own a copy of the Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC), and I used to import cheap(er) copies to sell.  It is a good book to have as reference material, especially to check up on the teaching of the Church.  However, the nature of the book makes it a kind of an ‘encyclopaedia’ of Church teaching, and unless one is interested in a certain topic, reading the whole Catechism can be quite laborious.  The exception is the part on “Prayer” (Part Four of the Catechism).  I want to quote you
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This is my Son the beloved……

The first reading (Genesis 12:1-4) for this Sunday’s Mass tells us that for nearly two thousand years before the coming of Christ, God’s saving plan was already well in motion. A man named Abram (later to be renamed Abraham) would father the people into which Christ would be born. His descendants would be a selected group – a ‘Chosen people’, the ‘People of God’ They would be guided by God’s prophets, and blessed with favours and gradually prepared to receive Christ into their midst.  What makes Abraham such a memorable and inspirational figure in the record of sacred history is
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He fasted for forty days…

(1st Sunday in Lent) The liturgical season of Lent begins with Ash Wednesday. The 40 days of Lent is our attempt to strengthen ourselves against temptations and to overcome sinfulness. It mirrors Jesus time in the desert where for 40 days He faced temptations and trials – but He did not give in. In the desert, there is nowhere to hide. In Lent we enter into our own desert, so to speak, to focus on the things that tempt us from the straight and narrow, and to strengthen ourselves spiritually that we may live good and holy lives. Since early
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Do not be anxious about your life…

In the Gospel for this Sunday Jesus did not minced His words: “No man can serve two masters…You cannot serve God and mammon.” We tend to think of ‘mammon’ as money or wealth. It means more than that. The word ‘mammon’ comes from a Hebrew root that means “to entrust” – like today we speak about credit, trust funds and bonds – we trust in them!. Mammon came to mean “that in which a person places his trust.” (cf. Barclay’s commentary on Matthew’s Gospel). Mammon can become a substitute for God; an idol, a false God – an end all
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But I say this to you (Part II)

(7th Sunday in Ordinary Time) In this Sunday’s Gospel, Jesus continues with putting His mark on the Old Law:  “You heard it said (referring to the Law and Prophets)”…… “but I say this to you”. “You have learnt how it was said: You must love your neighbour and hate your enemy. But I say this to you: love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you…” The Old Law which Jesus refers to can be found in the book of Exodus (21:23-25) “ If any harm follows, then you shall give life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth,
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But I say this to you!!

(6th Sunday in Ordinary Time) St Matthew wrote his Gospel addressing Jewish converts who had come to recognised Jesus as the Messiah. The first five books of the Old Testament, namely the books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy, are collectively known as the Torah. In the Gospel of Matthew, there is a structure based on the Torah. It is because St Matthew addressed the Jewish converts who were very familiar with the Torah, and he wanted them to see how in the person of Jesus was the fulfilment of the Old Testament prophecies, and therefore He was the
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You are the Salt of the Earth

(5th Sunday in Ordinary Time) In this Sunday’s Gospel (Matthew 5:13-16) Jesus uses two imagery to teach what his discipleship entails: to be His disciples is to be ‘salt of the earth’ and ‘light of the world’.  What salt and light do makes a positive difference to others.  A true Christian is a person not just for himself, but also for others – he has an effect, a positive effect, on his environment in which he lives.  Actually, reading the passage carefully, we will find that Our Lord does not say we are to become salt and light, but that
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Blessed are you…..

(4th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A) The Gospel passage for this Sunday from the Gospel of Matthew (5;1-12) gives us the teaching of Jesus that has now come to be known as the “Beatitudes”. It sounds like the “Bad-attitudes”, but they are actually the “Good Attitudes”! The Biblical translation we use for Mass use the word “Happy”, but some translation use the world “Blessed”. In essence, both the English word ‘happy’ and ‘Blessed’ are needed to describe Jesus’ teachings on the Beatitudes We seek happiness, but often we look for it in the wrong places – after all, the
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Repent and Believe

(Third Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year A) In the Gospel reading for this Sunday (Matthew 4:12-23 ), Our Lord starts His public ministry soon after John the Baptist was arrested. He started by preaching or making two demands: repent and believe! To repent is to change, to leave behind the way we were. It’s not just an attempt to ‘sin no more’, but it is also a new way of being, a new way of living, and a new view of life. Sometimes it is a dramatic process, but more often it is a daily process of growth. The
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Behold the Lamb of God!

15th January 2017 – 2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time In the Biblical account in the Book of Exodus, the blood of the sacrificial lamb was put on the doorposts of the People of God, and death ‘pass over’ their household – but not of that of the Egyptians who enslaved them. It was the event that liberated the People of God from their bondage to the Egyptians. Ever since that event, the People of God celebrated the Passover feast as a memorial. This was the Last Supper feast that Jesus celebrated as He instituted the Mass. The true bondage in
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