Behold the King Comes…

(Palm/Passion Sunday)   On Palm Sunday or Passion Sunday we as People, as a Church, have commemorated without fail for over twenty centuries, the triumphal welcome given by the people to Jesus as He enters Jerusalem.  His entrance was greeted with joy and celebration, with words such as “Hosanna to the Son of David!”, which acknowledge Him as the long awaited messiah.  This event was long prophesied: “This took place to fulfil what was spoken by the prophet, saying, “Tell ye the daughter of Sion, Behold, thy King cometh unto thee, meek, and sitting upon an ass, and a colt
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I am the Resurrection and the Life

(5th Sunday in Lent – Year A) Reading the four Gospels we find that Jesus knows and speaks about His impending death and Resurrection (e.g. Mt 16:21; 17:9; 17:23; 20:19; Mk 8:31; 9:9; 9:31; 10:34; Lk 9:22; 18:33; Jn 6:39-44, 54).    As our Lenten journey advances towards the Easter festivities, more and more, the Gospel passage each Sunday sheds light on the Mission of Jesus.  This Sunday we are presented with the Gospel passage (John 11:1-45) in which Jesus raised Lazarus from the dead.    It is an illustration of His claim: “I am the resurrection and the life; he
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Do you believe in the Son of Man?

(4th Sunday of Lent)   To be blind is not being able to see.  This is ‘physical blindness’.   This Sunday we are presented with the Gospel passage about another kind of blindness.  There are those who look but do not see – those who have a blindness in their faith, and lack to vision of the heart.  Jesus cures a man blind from birth but some people did not want to believe, for believing might make a demand of them.  This type of blindness – or ‘selective vision’ – is prevalent.  Choosing not ‘to see’ is a escape from accepting
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You will never be thirsty again…

(3rd Sunday of Lent) I have always encouraged Catholics to own a copy of the Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC), and I used to import cheap(er) copies to sell.  It is a good book to have as reference material, especially to check up on the teaching of the Church.  However, the nature of the book makes it a kind of an ‘encyclopaedia’ of Church teaching, and unless one is interested in a certain topic, reading the whole Catechism can be quite laborious.  The exception is the part on “Prayer” (Part Four of the Catechism).  I want to quote you
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This is my Son the beloved……

The first reading (Genesis 12:1-4) for this Sunday’s Mass tells us that for nearly two thousand years before the coming of Christ, God’s saving plan was already well in motion. A man named Abram (later to be renamed Abraham) would father the people into which Christ would be born. His descendants would be a selected group – a ‘Chosen people’, the ‘People of God’ They would be guided by God’s prophets, and blessed with favours and gradually prepared to receive Christ into their midst.  What makes Abraham such a memorable and inspirational figure in the record of sacred history is
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He fasted for forty days…

(1st Sunday in Lent) The liturgical season of Lent begins with Ash Wednesday. The 40 days of Lent is our attempt to strengthen ourselves against temptations and to overcome sinfulness. It mirrors Jesus time in the desert where for 40 days He faced temptations and trials – but He did not give in. In the desert, there is nowhere to hide. In Lent we enter into our own desert, so to speak, to focus on the things that tempt us from the straight and narrow, and to strengthen ourselves spiritually that we may live good and holy lives. Since early
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Do not be anxious about your life…

In the Gospel for this Sunday Jesus did not minced His words: “No man can serve two masters…You cannot serve God and mammon.” We tend to think of ‘mammon’ as money or wealth. It means more than that. The word ‘mammon’ comes from a Hebrew root that means “to entrust” – like today we speak about credit, trust funds and bonds – we trust in them!. Mammon came to mean “that in which a person places his trust.” (cf. Barclay’s commentary on Matthew’s Gospel). Mammon can become a substitute for God; an idol, a false God – an end all
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But I say this to you (Part II)

(7th Sunday in Ordinary Time) In this Sunday’s Gospel, Jesus continues with putting His mark on the Old Law:  “You heard it said (referring to the Law and Prophets)”…… “but I say this to you”. “You have learnt how it was said: You must love your neighbour and hate your enemy. But I say this to you: love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you…” The Old Law which Jesus refers to can be found in the book of Exodus (21:23-25) “ If any harm follows, then you shall give life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth,
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But I say this to you!!

(6th Sunday in Ordinary Time) St Matthew wrote his Gospel addressing Jewish converts who had come to recognised Jesus as the Messiah. The first five books of the Old Testament, namely the books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy, are collectively known as the Torah. In the Gospel of Matthew, there is a structure based on the Torah. It is because St Matthew addressed the Jewish converts who were very familiar with the Torah, and he wanted them to see how in the person of Jesus was the fulfilment of the Old Testament prophecies, and therefore He was the
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