Archives for Newsletter

Many are invited, few are chosen

28th Sunday in Ordinary Time This Sunday’s Gospel Passage (Matt 22:1-10) presents us with another parable.  In the parable a King invites people to the wedding feast of his son.  When the king came in to meet the guests, he saw a man there not dressed in a wedding garment.  The king, rather harshly, asks his attendants to “bind the man’s hands and feet, and cast him into the darkness outside, where there will be wailing and grinding of teeth.”  Jesus goes on to say:  “Many are invited, but few are chosen”.  The man represents the sinner who wants to
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Be persistent with Prayer

27th Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year A   “O what peace we often forfeit, O what needless pain we bear, All because we do not carry Everything to God in prayer!” – These were the words of a 19th century Presbyterian pastor, reminding us of what we are missing out on when we do not pray. Continually we are faced with difficulties, worries and concerns. Continually we hold onto them and try to process them ourselves and without the help of God. But as our second reading reminds us, the peace of God will always come to us when we
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Parable of the Two Sons

26th Sunday in Ordinary Time Jesus presents us with the parable of the two sons (Matthew. 21:28-32): one, when invited to work in the vineyard, says ‘No’ but later thought the better of it and goes, and another who says ‘Yes’ but did not go. The son who did not go used the words, “Certainly Sir”.  ‘Sir’, is a word which is also translated as ‘Lord’ (Kyrie).  Jesus reinforces what he said in an earlier episode: “…it is not everyone who says, Lord, Lord, who does the will of the Father (Matthew. 7:21) ”.   Others who have said ‘No’ to
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Death Has Loss Its Sting…

25th Sunday in Ordinary Time   The second reading for this Sunday is somewhat of a paradox – as Saint Paul writes, “For to me life is Christ, and death is gain.” Generally most people don’t think of death as gain. But this phrase used by Paul shows that thanks to Christ, everything we do here on earth is unified to what happens to us after death. For Pagan religions back then, death was considered ‘the great destroyer’, and whilst they did believe in some form of after-life, it was meaningless and joyless. But in Christianity, Christ broke down that
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If you have not warned the wicked man, then I will hold you responsible for his death.

23rd Sunday in Ordinary TIme   Our reading from Ezekiel this week contains some rather heavy language pertaining to sin and death. Not only does it remind us of the seriousness of sin, but also of our responsibility in helping others to avoid it. This can be a difficult task. No-one really likes to approach people to question or challenge their behaviour – in our Gospel it takes at least two people. But rest-assured if we pray to have the persons best interests at heart, then they will come to understand it not as a personal attack but rather as
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Take up Your Cross and Follow Me….

22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time It is very interesting to see how we as a community of believers can, at times, lose our Catholic culture and consciousness.  There was a time, when the majority of Catholics would instinctively know that we use the Crucifix in our liturgical celebrations rather than an ‘empty’ cross.  Thus there was a time when our liturgical documents loosely used the word ‘cross’ even when referring to the ‘crucifix’, taking it for granted that Catholics would know.  Furthermore, in the Latin version of the documents, the word ‘crux’, which literally means ‘cross’, was used also to
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Who Do You Say I am?

21st Week in Ordinary Time In this weekend’s Gospel Peter receives that all important question – “who do you say I am.” Jesus wasn’t concerned about what others had told Peter, he wanted Peter’s own assessment. There are two ways we can know people. The first type, is what we hear about people from others. In other words, we know people by what others have told us about them. This type of knowing has its usefulness, but can also be very dangerous because we shape our opinions of a person on how other people perceive them. The second type of
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Woman you have great faith

20th Sunday in Ordinary Time   In the Old Testament, it was prophesied that when the Messiah comes, right worship, and right ordering of the meeting between God and humanity will once again be re-established.   In ways unexpected, that prophecy was fulfilled in the very person of Christ.  Jesus is the Temple, and the true meeting place of God and humanity.  When He commanded us (‘Do this in memory of me….’) to celebrate the Eucharist He established.  The Eucharistic celebration is the occasion for right worship, and right ordering of the meeting between God and humanity takes place.  To appreciate
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Truly You are the Son of God

19th Sunday in Ordinary Time   Today’s Gospel is again more proof that Jesus was the person he said He was; the Son of God.  In the times of the New Testament, the people understood the seas and lakes as something to be feared. They were a potential for turmoil and havoc that only God could control, as He did in the creation account of Genesis. So here was Jesus doing the things that the people thought only God could do. Hence the confession from Peter – “Truly, you are the Son of God.” Right throughout the week, we have
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His Face Shone like the Sun

Feast of the Transfiguration   The event of the Transfiguration of Jesus is clearly recorded in the New Testament in the Synoptic Gospels (Matt 17:1-8, Mark 9:2-8, Luke 9:28-36), and in Second Epistle of St Peter (2 Pet 1:16-18).  The Gospel of John is likely to be alluding to it in the famous line about the Incarnation of Christ: “The Word became flesh, he lived among us, and we saw his glory, the glory that He has from the Father as only Son of the Father, full of grace and truth”.  Presumably, the idea of the glory of God is
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